By Anna Jankowska MA LCPC

 

Whenever you are arrested for a DUI whether it is in the state of Illinois or in any other state, you have to undergo a drug and alcohol evaluation. The purpose of this evaluation is to determine the degree of the person’s alcohol and/or drug use and what risk that poses to public safety. There are two different reasons why people want to obtain a Drug and Alcohol Evaluation. Some people need it for the court, including out of state cases, others need it for Secretary of State License Reinstatement.

If you live in any other state and want to obtain your license in the state of Illinois or outside of the state of Illinois, you still need to obtain a Drug and Alcohol Evaluation. This evaluation has to be obtained in person if you live in the state of Illinois. And if you live outside of the state of Illinois you can complete and out of state pocket. This pocket could be filled out by a petitioner or a counselor. Whoever fills out the pocket needs to be familiar with the state of Illinois regulations pertaining to completion of DUI Evaluations. Some clients decide to come to the state of Illinois to obtain a DUI Evaluation even if they live elsewhere, only because they want to ensure that the DUI Evaluation is done properly.

Whatever your circumstances you still need to gather specific documents in order to prepare yourself for the DUI Evaluation.What is a DUI Evaluation?

 

The following documents are required for Drug and Alcohol Evaluations:

  • Driving Record for Court Purposes that’s not older than 30 days, or a Consultation Checklist obtained from an informal hearing officer from the Secretary of State Office
  • Sworn Report or Police Report that includes the information from the night of the DUI arrest including the results of the breathalyzer test or a drug test

 

The Drug and Alcohol Evaluation takes about 2 hours and includes an interview with the counselor and completion of a questionnaire that focus on drug and/or alcohol use throughout the client’s life.

 

The interview with the counselor consists of several parts:

  1. Client’s demographic information
  2. Most recent DUI arrest in details
  3. Prior drug and alcohol related offenses including supervisions and convictions for a DUI. It also asks specific information about other substance related arrests such as zero tolerance, illegal transportation and other substance related arrests that are not related to driving.
  4. Alcohol/drug history in detail, including alcohol, legal drugs and prescription medications. This part also includes significant other interview and prior treatment program completion if it is relevant to the petitioner.
  5. Questionnaire information and summary of the findings.
  6. Criteria for substance use disorder based on DSM5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). Client is being asked questions pertaining to different symptoms regarding substance use disorder.
  7. Summarizes all the components of the evaluation concentrating on forensic findings and clinical findings. Final classification is a result of the DUI Evaluation.

 

Clients can be classified at 4 different risk levels:

  1. Minimal Risk
  2. Moderate Risk
  3. Significant Risk
  4. High Risk

 

Depending on the risk level different amount of the education / drug and alcohol treatment needs to be completed prior to reinstatement of a driver’s license.

 

Whatever the purpose of the Drug and Alcohol Evaluation it needs to be consistent and well written. The petitioner and the counselor are both collaborators in preparing the evaluation. The client needs to be honest and comprehensive in his answers in order for the counselor to prepare a good evaluation.